Cheryl Strayed

Thursday, May 3rd
7:30pm

Taylor Auditorium in Marsh Hall
This reading is free and open to the public.

CHERYL STRAYED’S memoir Wild, just released to critical acclaim, gives a vivid account of Strayed’s eleven-hundred-mile solo hike of the Pacific Crest trail when she was 26 after the death of her mother.  Her bitingly honest and compassionate nonfiction and fiction have won her recognition from sources as disparate as Poets & Writers and Vogue magazine. She is a Pushcart Prize recipient, the popular columnist “Sugar” on the TheRumpus.net, and a founder of the organization VIDA, Women in Literary Arts. Her essays and stories can be found in a wide array of journals and anthologies including The Best American Essays, Best New American Voices, and other publications.

This reading will take place in Taylor Auditorium in Marsh Hall on Thursday, May 3rd, at 7:30 p.m. This event is sponsored by the Department of English, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the English Club. It is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Professor Kathlene Postma at kathlene_postma@pacificu.edu.

Debra Gwartney

Thursday, April 19th
7:30pm

Taylor Auditorium in Marsh Hall
This reading is free and open to the public.

DEBRA GWARTNEY is the author of of the memoir Live Through This, a harrowing story of Gwartney’s search for her two daughters who ran away from home when they were in their teens.  Live Through This was a 2009 finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the National Books for a Better Life Award and the Oregon Book Award. With her husband Barry Lopez, Gwartney is the co-editor of  Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape. Her essays have been featured in publications including American Scholar, Prairie Schooner, Salon, Crab Orchard Review, and The New York Times.

This reading will take place in Taylor Auditorium in Marsh Hall on Thursday, April 19th, at 7:30 p.m. This event is sponsored by the Department of English, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the English Club. It is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Professor Kathlene Postma at kathlene_postma@pacificu.edu.

Patricia Smith

Thursday, March 8th
7:30pm

La Hacienda on Main Street
This reading is free and open to the public.

PATRICIA SMITH is the author of five books of poetry, including her latest, Blood Diamond. Chronicling the devastation and aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Blood Diamond was named one of NPR’s top books of 2008. Her poems have appeared in anthologies such as Poetry, The Paris Review, Harvard Divinity Bulletin, the Chautauqua Literary Journal, TriQuarterly, and many more. A gifted performer, Smith also holds the title of the most successful competitor in the history of Poetry Slam as a four-time national individual champion.
This reading will take place at La Hacienda on Main Street on Thursday, March 8th, at 7:30 p.m. This event is sponsored by the Center for Gender Equity, the Department of English, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the English Club. It is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Professor Kathlene Postma at kathlene_postma@pacificu.edu.

Liliana Ursu

Tuesday, February 28th 7pm

Taylor Auditorium in Marsh Hall

This reading is free and open to the public.

Romanian poet LILIANA URSU has written more than twenty books of poetry, prose, and translations.  Her first book was published in 1977 while she worked at Romanian National Radio, where she faced lists of prohibited words and Communist censorship. After the fall of the regime in 1989, she was able to attend literary conferences in Europe, including one in Spain, where she met Tess Gallagher.  Through her, Ursu came to be known in the United States. Her current poetry interprets the new freedoms of travel that Romanians have enjoyed in recent decades, an experience radically different than their oppression under Ceausescu.  Ursu has had two Fulbrights, taught at three U.S. universities, and has been widely published in journals such as Massachusetts Review, American Poetry Review, and The New Yorker.

Sponsored by the Elise Elliott Grant, the Tom McCall Center, the Visiting Writers Series,  the Center for Gender Equity, and the Department of English.  Contact Professor Darlene Pagán for more information at dmpagan@pacificu.edu.

Ellen Margolis

Ellen Margolis

Tuesday, December 6th
7:30pm

Taylor Auditorium in Marsh Hall
This reading is free and open to the public.

Ellen Margolis has seen her work produced at theatres throughout the United States.  Her plays have been recognized by the New York International Fringe Festival, the National 10-Minute Play Competition, and the Trustus Playwrights’ Festival.  Among them, How to Draw Mystical Creatures was recognized for Outstanding Achievement in Playwriting by the New York International Fringe Festival, and A Little Chatter, commissioned by Mile Square Theatre, was a finalist in the 2008 National 10-Minute Play Competition.  She is a member of Playwrights West, Portland’s new-work theatre, and of The Forgery, an actors’ collective.


Writers on Campus

Pacific University’s Visiting Writers Series continues Nov. 3 with readings from the Department of English, featuring works from Professors Darlene Pagán, Kathlene Postma and Doyle Wesley Walls. The three will be presenting personal works in the genres of fiction, nonfiction and poetry.

DARLENE PAGÁN has poems forthcoming in CalyxHayden’s Ferry Review and Poet Lore.  Her poetry and nonfiction also have appeared inHiram Poetry ReviewMemoir (and), Hawaii Pacific ReviewLiteral Latteand Brevity.  She is at work on a host of writing projects.

In her latest fiction, KATHLENE POSTMA draws on her experiences working with orphaned children in China. She will read a chapter from her novel draft Boat on a Lake in the Dark. Her fiction, nonfiction and poetry have been published or will soon appear in Los Angeles Review,Willow SpringsHawaii ReviewGreen Mountains ReviewNatural Bridgeand other magazines. She edits Silk Road Review.

DOYLE WESLEY WALLS has published poetry, personal essays, short stories, cartoons, fiction and prose satires. He is the author of a poetry chapbook Greatest Hits: 1979-2008. Some of his published works are available online through Pacific’s “Common Knowledge.”  He and his wife have published two sons; his best work, clearly, is the result of collaboration.

This reading will take place in Taylor Auditorium in Marsh Hall on Thursday, Nov. 3, at 7:30 p.m. This event is sponsored by the Department of English, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the English Club. It is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Professor Kathlene Postma at kathlene_postma@pacificu.edu.

Tess Gallagher

Monday, October 24th
7:30pm

Taylor Auditorium in Marsh Hall
This reading is free and open to the public.

Poet Tess Gallagher is the featured author for the month of October in Pacific University’s Visiting Writers Series.

Gallagher is the author of eight volumes of poetry, including her latest, Midnight Lantern: New and Selected Poems, published by Graywolf Press.

She is the recipient of two National Endowment of the Arts awards and the Maxine Cushing Gray Foundation award, as well as a fellowship from the Guggenheim Foundation.

For more information on Tess Gallagher and her works, click here.

Her reading is free and open to the public.